School Information Overview Academies & Pathways AVID Program Gifted & Talented Education (G.A.T.E.) Administration Administrative Assistants ALHS' School Site Council (SSC) Directions to ALHS History of ALHS Mission Statement School's Policies Advanced Placement Program Attendance Policy/Information ALHS Course Descriptions Permits to Leave (PTL) Campus Virtual Photo Tour Class Schedule Frequently Asked Questions Onsite Campus Tours & Shadowing Program for 8th Graders Breakfast & Lunch at ALHS About This Website
Students Overview Class of 2017 (Seniors) Class of 2018 (Juniors) Class of 2019 (Sophomores) Class of 2020 (Freshmen) Associated Student Body (ASB) Brotherhood/Sisterhood Assembly (BSA) After School Program Clubs Health Idol Mustang TV Performing Arts Showcase Wellness Center Yearbook College & Career Center Visual Arts Gallery Buying Student Portraits Student Dance Contract & Guest Clearance Form Lincoln Log Newspaper Peer Resources Lincoln Log Archive Principal's Cabinet
Faculty & Staff Directory Career Technical Education Dept. Counseling Dept. English Dept. ESL Dept. JROTC Mathematics Dept. Physical Education Dept. Science Dept. Social Studies Dept. Special Education Dept. Visual & Performing Arts Dept. World Languages Dept. Dean's Dept. Wellness Center Dept.
Parents & Community Overview PTSA Committee PTSA Fundraising PTSA Fundraising Gala PTSA Membership English Learner Advisory Committee Parent Liaisons PTSA Reflections Program
Teams By Season Requirements For Participation Forms Tryouts Coaches Directory League and Section Affliations Complete League Schedules and Standings Individual S.F. Section Award Winners Championships Photos Sports Calendar Job Openings Sports Team Pages
Abraham Lincoln High School Alumni Association Events Board of Directors Alumni Lincoln Log Yearbooks Scholarships Wall of Fame Sports Hall of Fame Pictures Reunions Alumni Store Links Missing Lincs In Memoriam
Library Overview Library & Computer Labs Hours and Policy Catalog Databases and Reference ALHS Book Review Online Submission Form ALHS Book Review Postings
Home Page Logo

ALHS Course Descriptions

NOTE: Scroll down for a listing of just Advanced Placement (AP) & Honors Courses

 

ENGLISH

 

Ninth Grade World Literature

Freshmen read a wide range of literature including but not limited to: To Kill A Mockingbird, The Odyssey, Romeo and Juliet, Mythology and You, Lord of the Flies and Animal Farm.  We introduce critical reading skills such as annotation, vocabulary development recognition of literary devices, and analysis of writing style for theme and tone. The basic structure of an essay is introduced and students are expected to learn how to write a personal narrative essay and an analytical, literature based essay.  Grammar, usage and mechanics are taught through revision of student writing and direct instruction. Some of the language concepts that we emphasize in ninth grade are: the parts of speech, the rules of punctuation, subject-verb agreement, comma splices and the parts of a sentence.

 

Tenth Grade Ethnic Literature

Sophomores read a wide range of literature including but not limited to: The Joy Luck Club, Othello, Maus, The Color of Water, Raisin in the Sun, The Jungle, Yellow Raft In Blue Water and Bless Me Ultima. We continue to build upon critical reading skills such as annotation, recognition of literary devices, vocabulary development, and an analysis of writing style for theme, tone, characterization and conflict. Students are expected to write more complex and developed analytical, literature-based essays, as well as expository essays.  MLA guidelines are introduced for citation and formatting. Grammar, usage and mechanics are taught through revision of student writing and direct instruction. Some of the language concepts that we emphasize in tenth grade are: syntactical structures, parallel structure, subject-verb agreement, the parts of speech (in more depth), clauses, and pronoun antecedent agreement.

 

Eleventh Grade American Literature

Juniors read a wide range of literature including but not limited to: The Crucible, The Great Gatsby, Of Mice and Men, The Grapes of Wrath, Sula, and The Catcher in the Rye. We continue to build upon critical reading skills such as annotation, close reading, recognition of literary devices, vocabulary development, and an analysis of writing style for theme, tone, characterization, conflict, purpose,  context, and audience. Students are expected to write more complex and developed analytical, literature-based essays, expository essays and persuasive essays. MLA guidelines are reinforced for citation and formatting. Grammar, usage and mechanics are taught through revision of student writing and direct instruction. Ninth and tenth grade grammar and usage concepts are reviewed. In addition, new concepts such as active versus passive voice and syntactical variety in student writing are introduced.

 

Twelfth Grade British Literature

Seniors read a wide range of literature including but not limited to: Frankenstein, Wuthering Heights, Antigone, Plato’s Allegory of the Cave, Hamlet, Macbeth, and The Stranger. We continue to build upon critical reading skills such as annotation, close reading, recognition of literary devices, vocabulary development, and an analysis of writing style for theme, tone, characterization, conflict, purpose, context, and audience. Students are expected to write more complex and developed analytical, literature-based essays, expository essays and persuasive essays. Students are also expected to write a personal statement in preparation for college applications. MLA guidelines are reinforced for citation and formatting. Grammar, usage and mechanics are taught through revision of student writing and direct instruction.  All grammar and usage concepts are reviewed and assessed.

 

Eleventh Grade Honors American Literature

This course uses canonical American texts to chronologically explore the development of America as a nation, an identity and an idea.  We investigate themes such as: the importance of self-reliance, action versus inaction, and having the courage of one’s convictions. Semester one follows early American history and we read authors such as Miller, Emerson, Jefferson, Thoreau and Twain.  In semester two, American issues of modernity such as alienation versus connection, industrialization, greed, and compassion are explored through authors such as Steinbeck, Fitzgerald, and Salinger. We learn how to read texts not just for meaning, but to deconstruct how a text creates meaning through stylistic choices and rhetoric. Additionally, students will begin to purposefully utilize elevated stylistic devices for effect in their own writing.  The Language and Composition AP exam is optional with this course.

Twelfth Grade Advanced Placement English Literature 

In this course, students will read a number of classic works reflective of the European and American Literature canon.  Shakespeare, Dostoyevsky, Austen, Ellison and other writers and poets offer striking insights into such universal themes as identity, alienation, power, and community.  We will explore the ways that the art and literature in Europe and the United States were both reflective and prophetic about the way people saw and understood the world in which they lived.  We will try to use these texts as lenses through which we can make sense of the United States at the beginning of a new millennium and in the middle of our postmodern age (the proliferation of technology, consumerism, psychoanalysis, 9/11, globalization).  Concurrently, students will learn to move beyond simple comprehension of a text to an understanding of writing as craft (analyzing structure, style and themes), and will incorporate these techniques into their own expository and interpretative essays.  This course meets all the curricular requirements as described in the AP English Course Description guide and has been approved by the Advanced Placement College Board.  

MATHEMATICS

 

Algebra 1 - 2

This course is one year of college preparatory Algebra in two semesters. Topics include solving linear and quadratic equations, solving systems of equations, graphing linear and quadratic equations.

 

Geometry 1 – 2

This course covers topics including proofs, congruence, similarity, properties of parallel lines cut by a transversal, polygons, circles, perimeter, area, volume, three dimensional figures, special triangles and polygons such as squares, and Pythagorean theorem.

 

Advanced Algebra 1 – 2

Students study topics including solving equations & inequalities using absolute value, solving systems of equations in a variety of methods, performing operations on polynomials & rational expressions.

 

Precalculus

This course covers all of the traditional trigonometry topics as well as many analytic geometry topics.

 

Statistics and Probability

This course has a hands-on approach so students generate their own data. Topics include linear regression, analysis of one variable data, introductory inference, and probability.

 

Advanced Placement Statistics

This course is the College Board Advanced Placement Statistics course and includes all of the topics listed on the College Board website. The course has four main components: exploratory analysis, probability, experimental design, and inference. Students enrolling in this course must have fairly high reading and writing ability and must have successfully completed through Advanced Algebra.

Advanced Placement Calculus

Students must complete Precalculus successfully to enroll in this course. Students must also pass a placement test and have teacher recommendation to enroll. This course is very similar to the UC Berkeley course and assumes students have had some background in Analytic Geometry in addition to Trigonometry before entering this course. The course covers all of the topics in the College Board syllabus for this course as well as a few additional topics. Students taking this course must take the Advanced Placement exam in May of the year they take the course. Students who pass the Advanced Placement exam are then eligible for college credit at many universities.

 

SCIENCE

 

Biology 1 -2

This course is a study of the major topics in the life sciences.

 

Physics 1 -2

The investigation of energy and its interactions with matter is studied. This course has a lot of mathematics but at an introductory level. It is designed to help students do well in the other physical sciences like Chemistry.

 

Conceptual Physics 1-2

The topics are the same as Physics 1-2 but taught with more emphasis on the written word and less on math.

 

Chemistry 1-2

The principles of general chemistry will be studied. This course, which is very mathematical, explores how matter is put together. Chemistry is necessary for anybody with an interest in any of the sciences, engineering or medicine.  Students should pass Physics 1-2 before taking Chemistry. 

 

Physiology

This course examines the structure and function of the human body, emphasizing the various organ systems and their interactions. Topics include cell/tissue biology, organ systems, disease states, and making choices that maximize healthy body function. Laboratory work is included.

 

Principles of Biotechnology 1 – 2

Students are prepared to pursue post-secondary education leading to future employment in the Biotech Industry. Over 900 biotech companies are in the bay area and salaries are among the highest in the nation. The course is grounded in molecular biology and genetics, and emphasizes basic and advanced lab techniques used in scientific research the world over. Students may have an opportunity to do paid offsite internships.

 

Principles of Biotechnology 3 - 4

A continuation of Biotechnology 1 & 2. Independent laboratory work is emphasized. Students engage in a series of advanced laboratory exercises and are trained in a variety of complex laboratory and research skills.  iGEM team members, chosen from this class, participate as part of a team from UCSF’s Mission Bay. iGEM is an annual international synthetic biology competition that originated at MIT.

 

Advanced Placement Biology

This course covers the equivalent of a first-year university “introduction to biology” course, as outlined by the College Board. The AP Biology course is designed to be taken by students after the successful completion of a first course in high school biology and one in high school chemistry. It aims to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology. Students prepared for and required to take the AP exam. College-level reading skills highly recommended.

 

Advanced Placement Environmental Science

This course covers the equivalent of a first-semester university ES course, as outlined by the College Board. Students prepare for and are required to take the AP exam. Students who wish to be informed about current ecological issues are encouraged to take this course. It is highly recommended for students to take Chemistry before this course.

 

SOCIAL STUDIES

 

Ethnic Studies

Ethnic Studies is a history class that looks at the history of the United States from a non-traditional point of view. We will begin by exploring your experiences, and we will use your experiences as the foundation for this class. We will study what role race, ethnicity, nationality, and culture have played in the development of your own identity, the identity of your community, and the identity of our country. We will study instances in which people have struggled against injustice, including those which resulted in the establishment of ethnic studies programs in public schools and universities. We will also focus on developing reading, writing, note-taking and discussion skills necessary to create and present well-organized arguments on the themes of identity, institutions of power and resistance. 

 

Modern World History 1 -2

This course links past history to the modern world from 1789 to the present. Topics include Rise of Democracy, Revolutions, Industrial Revolution, Imperialism, World Wars I & II. Studies include specific nations from different continents illustrating nationalism in the contemporary world.

 

United States History 1 -2

After a review of the nation's beginning, students study major turning points in 20th Century American History.

 

Principles of American Democracy

This course will prepare students to vote, participate in community activities, and assume the responsibilities of citizenship. Students in grade twelve will pursue a deeper understanding of how the American government works. They will compare systems of government in the world today and analyze the history and changing interpretations of the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and the current state of the legislative, executive, and judiciary branches of government. In addition students will learn about the interaction relationship among federal, state, and local governments, the election process and the role of the media in society.

 

Economics

The study of economics will change the way students think! Students successfully completing this course will apply common economic terms, concepts and reasoning to their everyday lives. This course provides an introduction to basic economic principles of micro- and macroeconomics, international economics and comparative economic systems. Students will master fundamental economic concepts, applying the tools (graphs, statistics, equations) from other subject areas to the understanding of operations and institutions of economic systems. This course also includes a study of current economic issues such as globalization and the environment.

 

Advanced Placement World History

This is a college level introductory course to world history. Over the course of the year, we will be studying the regions of Africa, the Americas, Asia, the Middle East, Oceania and Europe from 8,000 BCE to the present. The class focuses specifically on identifying changes and continuity within and among civilizations, and making comparisons between civilizations. In addition to content knowledge, students will read a college level textbook, read and analyze primary and secondary sources, and write analytical essays.

 

Advanced Placement United States History

This course is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in U.S. history. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students should learn to assess historical materials—their relevance to a given interpretive problem, reliability, and importance—and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. An AP U.S. History course should thus develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay format.

 

Advanced Placement United States Government and Politics

This course allows students the opportunity to study their government and the role they play as citizens. This college level course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific examples.  A large percentage of time is spent focused on the three branches of government and their roles in our lives. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. politics. Students will study the Constitution to understand their civil liberties and rights. Students completing this course will be empowered to find an active role in politics.

 

AP Human Geography 

Human geography is much more than the study of maps. This class focuses on the study of human beings, and analyzing the patterns of how we live on this earth. Topics include the study of human populations, culture, race and ethnicity, religion, languages, politics, human- environment interactions; (from Neolithic farmers to industrialization), the growth of cities (urbanization), and globalization. This course is a general survey or introductory course in the field of human geography; it is the equivalent of a one-semester entry- level college course. This counts as a G elective for UC/CSU. This course will open your eyes to the large and complex world that we live in. It will encourage you to see the world through different lenses, and hopefully will inspire you to travel and explore more for yourself after high school. This course will be rigorous, challenging and at times difficult. You should take this course because you are interested in the subject, and want to develop the academic skills that will prepare you for college.

 

 

AP Psychology

This is the senior capstone course for students enrolled in the Teacher Academy.  The course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice.  The course includes weekly visits to elementary schools that allow students to observe principles of psychology is action.  

 

WORLD LANGUAGES

 

1st year Chinese/French/Japanese/Spanish

This is a beginning course that emphasizes the development of communication skills and awareness of the target language cultures through activities and materials designed to develop language skills. Emphasis is placed on listening, speaking, reading and writing skills of the language to be used naturally and spontaneously in real life situations.

 

2nd Year Chinese/French/Japanese/Spanish

This is a continuation and expansion of skills mastered in the first year with continued emphasis on all language skills. Students are encouraged to create with the language using everyday routines, common events, and narrations of past and future actions.

 

3rd Year Chinese/French/Japanese/Spanish

This course reviews previously learned materials and introduces more complex vocabulary and grammatical structures to further develop listening, speaking, reading, writing, and critical thinking skills. Students comprehend and produce oral and written sentences and paragraphs dealing with topics related to self, the immediate environment, survival and courtesy in some informal and transactional settings.  

 

3rd Year Chinese/Japanese/Spanish Honors and 4th year Japanese Honors These courses provide students with extended content and additional workload. Students engage in more challenging communicative activities and develop critical reading skills. There is a comprehensive oral and written final examination.

 

4th year French

This course reviews previously learned materials and introduces more complex vocabulary and grammatical structures to further develop listening, speaking, reading, writing, and critical thinking skills. Students comprehend and produce oral and written paragraphs dealing with concrete and factual topics of public interest as well as practical, social and professional topics in most informal and some formal settings.

 

Language Courses for Native Speakers (E Courses)

These courses permit students to enhance existing language skills in their first language. The E courses focus on all areas of language development with emphasis on reading and writing skills and feature a significant study of culture, literature, and business language and reading. Additionally, Chinese 3E/4E accommodate immersion students.

 

Advanced Placement in World Language

AP Chinese Language/Japanese Language/Spanish Language/Spanish Literature: These courses follow the College Entrance Examination Board course description for advanced placement work in world languages. It prepares students to take the AP examination in May.

 

VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS

 

Art and Architecture

Art and Architecture is an introductory level, two semester, survey class designed to provide instruction for the secondary school student in the fundamental concepts of architecture, engineering and aesthetic appreciation.  The core curriculum emphasizes and integrates academic, practical, technical, and artistic skills. It fulfills the California Visual and Performing Arts High School graduation requirement and the UC A-G requirement.  9th grade students at ALHS who test into GEOMETRY are automatically enrolled in Art and Architecture as the two classes support one another.  Art and Architecture also meets the first year requirement for the Architecture, Construction and Engineering Pathway at ALHS.  The goal of the ACE pathway is to prepare students in all competencies for admission to Cal Poly SLO or the UC system. 

 

Art 1 - 2

Students learn a variety of art techniques, methods, and concepts that will promote creative expression. Focus on principles artists use, to think, produce, talk and write about art. Most lessons are project based.

 

Ceramics 1 -2

Students learn hands-on building techniques used for the construction & decoration of clay. Advanced students master methods and materials used in traditional & contemporary techniques.

 

Drama 1- 2

Students explore movement, vocal techniques & basic theater vocabulary, eventually creating characters/ scenes. Advanced students investigate complex scene study & focus on developed production and performances.

 

Drawing 1- 2

Assignments are designed for the serious art student and will cover one and two-point perspective, drawing from nature, figure drawing, portraiture, drawing from models and photographs, and exploring a variety of drawing styles and media. Advanced class gives students an opportunity to further develop drawing skills and produce a portfolio.

 

Orchestra

Orchestra students receive instruction in posture, tone production, instrument care, bowing techniques, scales, rhythm, and theory.

 

Photography

Students develop competence in basic camera operation, shooting, and darkroom skills. Advanced students learn to plan and execute complex projects.

 

Theater Technology (Beginning and Advanced)

Students learn the basic production & operational elements of theater. Each student puts in a number of hours outside the normal class time. Advanced students receive hands-on production experience.

 

Advanced Placement Studio Art

This independent AP class is a studio-based visual arts class emphasizing design: the formal elements of design such as line, color, texture, space, value, shape and form, as well as the principles of design:  unity, balance, contrast, repetition and variety.  Students enrolled must show a high level of motivation, independence and the ability to work on their own inside and outside of class.  The advanced level of this class means students will be learning college foundation artwork while in this course.  The AP portfolio requirements expect the student to address the following three main concepts:  breadth, concentration and quality.  Students will be expected to develop mastery in concept, composition and execution of ideas.  A successful completion and submission of a portfolio is required, and if scored a 3 or higher, may earn college credit at participating universities.  Artworks created prior to and outside of the AP course will be identified and may be considered for inclusion in the AP Art portfolio.  A minimum of 24 works dealing with the formal aspects of design will be completed for final portfolio submission to the College Board.   There are a variety of means for this expression including, but not limited to drawing, painting, photography, graphic design, mixed media, and collage.  Any 2-D process is acceptable to explore except for 3-D, video and photocopies of work.

 

Advanced Placement Ceramics

Students taking Ceramics for a second year will be considered Independent Study students and will be working on an AP 3D Portfolio. In this college-level course, students will pursue the investigation of three-dimensional form in ceramics. It is important that students learn to express themselves in their own personal style, using the elements and principles of art. Students will develop mastery in concept, composition and execution. Critiques with peers and teacher will be an ongoing process and form part of the assessment grade for the course. Other assessments will be formative (critiques, brainstorming, etc) and summative (tests) as requirements are completed. AP Studio Art is a program administered by the College Board to provide highly motivated student with an opportunity to earn college credit. Students will create a portfolio of artwork exploring 3D art and document that work using digital photography. In  May, students will submit their completed portfolio consisting of digital images to the College Board for scoring. If students receive a passing score of 3, 4, or 5 they may receive college credit for the class.

 

Advanced Placement Art History

A.P. Art History not only seeks to understand history through studying its works of art, but also to understand art by studying the context in which it was created.  Works of art document history.    How does art change through time, as the society and culture change?  What can art tell us about the people who lived and worked during the time period?  Students will learn to recognize art and architecture, its creator, time period, and meaning.  Students will write about art using the vocabulary necessary, compare and contrast different works, learn how artists borrow from one another and discuss how the art relates to the time and place of creation.  Students will learn how to collect and organize pertinent information, cross reference it and write coherently about it using the proper vocabulary.

 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION

 

Physical Education 1 -2 (Grade 9)

This core course is designed for ninth grade students to further develop team sports and gymnastic motor skills and aquatic fundamental skills. Rules, regulations, game strategy, and safety are emphasized for each activity. Social skill development is taught throughout the entire curriculum. The students learn the principles of fitness and experience its five components. Students assess their personal wellness level through a health-related fitness test and self-study. Students completing this course have designed their own personal fitness program based upon self-assessment data and appreciate physical education and the role it plays in developing an active lifestyle with healthy choices.  

 

Physical Education 3- 4 (Grades 10-12)

This course provides students with an opportunity to further develop individual and dual sport motor skills, dance, outdoor education, and self-defense fundamentals.  Rules, regulations, game strategy, and safety are emphasized for each activity. Social skills development is taught throughout the entire curriculum. All students complete a unit in CPR/First Aid. Students develop their own learning plan for acquiring a new motor skill, analyze their own movement performance by applying biomechanic principles, understand the purpose of physical education and give a historical perspective, and understand and appreciate movement from both a personal and social perspective. Course content include: principles of movement, learning through movement patterns, developing performance in sports, social skills for human movement, and participation in lifetime activities and exploring careers in physical education and health.              

 

Physical Education 5 -6 (Grades 11 and 12)

This course is designed for juniors and seniors to further develop fitness principles, development of a customized fitness plan, individual and dual sport activities. This course also can be sued for students who need to make up credit and who have filed PE 1/2, PE ¾. The Fitness Gram test will be administered to all students who have not passed this test. Students who have completed this course will have a better understanding of their physical fitness goals and healthy lifestyle choices.               

 

Swimming

Students must pass a proficiency test in swimming to meet high school graduation requirements. This course is designed to teach swimming skills and basic stroke techniques. Some survival skills include the ability to float and tread water, getting over the fear of water, learning to respect the water and proper breathing. Stroke techniques include the crawl stroke, back stroke, breast stroke, and butterfly stroke.        

 

Physical Education Independent Study

Independent study is a voluntary alternative instructional strategy for providing physical education. Students work independently, according to a written agreement and under the general supervision of a credentialed teacher. Attendance in independent study is based on the time value of the student’s work product, as determined by the student’s supervising teacher. Because independent study is an alternative instructional strategy, not an alternative curriculum, students follow the same course of study and meet the same academic standards as classroom-based students. Independent study requires all grade nine students to be tested in the state’s physical performance test (FITNESSGRAM®).

Junior Reserve Officer’s Training Corps (JROTC)

This course goal is to motivate and develop young people’s character. To accomplish this goal, the course combines classroom instruction and extracurricular activities oriented on attaining an awareness of the rights, responsibilities, and privileges of citizenship; developing the student’s (Cadet’s) sense of personal responsibility; building life skills; and providing leadership opportunities. The curriculum, taught by retired military professionals, encompasses a broad spectrum of subjects, including communication skills, leadership, physical fitness, first aid, drug abuse prevention, citizenship, and technology awareness.

 

ACADEMY PATHWAYS

 

Teacher Academy (Grades 10 – 12)

For students interested in learning about and working with children. Students volunteer weekly in area elementary school classrooms, supported by a mentor teacher. Between their junior and senior year, students work in paid middle school summer internships and can earn 3 college units from CCSF.  Courses include Orientation to Education, Psychology and Learning and Advanced Placement Psychology.

 

Green Academy (Grades 10-12)

Students study Geology, Environmental Science, US History, Economics, American Democracy, and Service Learning electives. Real-life experiences introduce them to the green collar workforce.  Students have the opportunity to take part in a paid summer internship as well as earning college credits at CCSF.

 

Academy of Information Technology (Grades 11-12)

This program provides in-depth, project-based experiences through students learning about and practicing professionally used business software such as Microsoft Office, as well as Adobe products such as Photoshop, PremierePro, AfterEffects, Dreamweaver, and Fireworks to design various multi-media and web projects. Courses include Computer Art, Computer Applications, Web Design and Multimedia. Students also learn about proper resume and cover letter writing, as well as interviewing skills so as to acquire a paid internship the summer after their junior.  Students can participate in paid summer internships in local business or industry related organizations.

 

Academy of Finance (Grades 11-12)

Students interested in careers in business or finance should apply to this academy. Students are introduced to the world of business and finance while becoming proficient in the Microsoft Office Suite.  Industry leaders provide real world experience through guest speaking, job shadowing, field trips, and mentoring, and certification in financial literacy and identity theft.  Career exploration and job preparation skills play a big role in this academy. Courses include computer applications/computer art, introduction to business and accounting, entrepreneurship, and business ethics. Students have the opportunity to participate in paid summer internships, job shadowing, as well as attend classes at City College.

 

SPECIAL PROGRAMS

 

Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID)

This is a college-preparatory program designed to teach students time management, test-taking strategies, and organizational and public speaking skills. Students are supported by teachers and peer tutors to encourage their academic success.

 

Step-To-College

This partnership between ALHS students and San Francisco State University offers a full year (one course each semester) of 6 free units of elective college credits in Orientation to Education and Critical Thinking and Decision Making.

 

Build SF

Seniors are taught by teachers and professionals associated with the Architectural Foundation of SF. Students intern two afternoons each week in architecture, engineering, construction or design firms.   Full day and half day program available.  Students take American Democracy and European Literature, with the possibility of taking math classes as well.

 

ELECTIVES

 

Health Education (1 semester, taken sequentially with Career Ed)

Students learn about emotional, mental, and physical health in this semester course. Topics include different body systems & organs of the human body; harmful effects of alcohol, tobacco, drug use; & caring for one’s body.

 

Career Education (1 semester, taken sequentially with Health Ed)

This course explores the different career options available in college and beyond. Practice job interviews, create a resumé, and fill out a job and/or college applications.

 

Journalism

Students learn real-world skills needed to produced journalistic reports for electronic or print media. Students report, write, edit, take photographs, and design layout for The Lincoln Log school newspaper.

 

Yearbook

Students in the yearbook class are responsible for creating, designing, editing, promoting, and selling the school's yearbook. Yearbook staff members learn and use the fundamentals of journalism, photography, and page design as well as elements of business and advertising.

 

Leadership

Students who are elected to Student Government may earn Leadership credit by attending required Student Government meetings, learning leadership skills and completing required responsibilities.

 

Peer Resources

A course designed to teach students inter- and intra-personal skills to become peer conflict mediators and teach other students about various health, self-esteem and relevant topics.

 

SPECIAL EDUCATION

 

Resource Specialist or Inclusion

Students provided with a study skills class, accommodations and modifications in general education class per Individual Education Program (IEP)

 

Special Day Class

Course selection varies depending on whether or not the student is pursuing a Diploma or Certificate of Completion.

 

English Language Development

Advanced Placement & Honors Course Descriptions

 

ENGLISH

 

Eleventh Grade Honors American Literature

This course uses canonical American texts to chronologically explore the development of America as a nation, an identity and an idea.  We investigate themes such as: the importance of self-reliance, action versus inaction, and having the courage of one’s convictions. Semester one follows early American history and we read authors such as Miller, Emerson, Jefferson, Thoreau and Twain.  In semester two, American issues of modernity such as alienation versus connection, industrialization, greed, and compassion are explored through authors such as Steinbeck, Fitzgerald, and Salinger. We learn how to read texts not just for meaning, but to deconstruct how a text creates meaning through stylistic choices and rhetoric. Additionally, students will begin to purposefully utilize elevated stylistic devices for effect in their own writing.  The Language and Composition AP exam is optional with this course.

Twelfth Grade Advanced Placement English Literature 

In this course, students will read a number of classic works reflective of the European and American Literature canon.  Shakespeare, Dostoyevsky, Austen, Ellison and other writers and poets offer striking insights into such universal themes as identity, alienation, power, and community.  We will explore the ways that the art and literature in Europe and the United States were both reflective and prophetic about the way people saw and understood the world in which they lived.  We will try to use these texts as lenses through which we can make sense of the United States at the beginning of a new millennium and in the middle of our postmodern age (the proliferation of technology, consumerism, psychoanalysis, 9/11, globalization).  Concurrently, students will learn to move beyond simple comprehension of a text to an understanding of writing as craft (analyzing structure, style and themes), and will incorporate these techniques into their own expository and interpretative essays.  This course meets all the curricular requirements as described in the AP English Course Description guide and has been approved by the Advanced Placement College Board.  

 

MATHEMATICS

 

Advanced Placement Statistics

This course is the College Board Advanced Placement Statistics course and includes all of the topics listed on the College Board website. The course has four main components: exploratory analysis, probability, experimental design, and inference. Students enrolling in this course must have fairly high reading and writing ability and must have successfully completed through Advanced Algebra. Parent approval is required to be eligible to take this course.

Advanced Placement Calculus

Students must complete Precalculus successfully to enroll in this course. Students must also pass a placement test and have teacher recommendation to enroll. This course is very similar to the UC Berkeley course and assumes students have had some background in Analytic Geometry in addition to Trigonometry before entering this course. The course covers all of the topics in the College Board syllabus for this course as well as a few additional topics. Students taking this course must take the Advanced Placement exam in May of the year they take the course. Students who pass the Advanced Placement exam are then eligible for college credit at many universities.

 

SCIENCE

 

Advanced Placement Biology

This course covers the equivalent of a first-year university “introduction to biology” course, as outlined by the College Board. The AP Biology course is designed to be taken by students after the successful completion of a first course in high school biology and one in high school chemistry. It aims to provide students with the conceptual framework, factual knowledge, and analytical skills necessary to deal critically with the rapidly changing science of biology.

 

Advanced Placement Environmental Science

This course covers the equivalent of a first-semester university ES course, as outlined by the College Board. Students prepare for and are required to take the AP exam. Students who wish to be informed about current ecological issues are encouraged to take this course. It is highly recommended for students to take Chemistry before this course.

 

 

SOCIAL STUDIES

Advanced Placement World History

This is a college level introductory course to world history. Over the course of the year, we will be studying the regions of Africa, the Americas, Asia, the Middle East, Oceania and Europe from 8,000 BCE to the present. The class focuses specifically on identifying changes and continuity within and among civilizations, and making comparisons between civilizations. In addition to content knowledge, students will read a college level textbook, read and analyze primary and secondary sources, and write analytical essays.

 

 

 

Advanced Placement United States History

The AP U.S. History course is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in U.S. history. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students should learn to assess historical materials—their relevance to a given interpretive problem, reliability, and importance—and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. An AP U.S. History course should thus develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay format.

 

Advanced Placement United States Government and Politics

This course allows students the opportunity to study their government and the role they play as citizens. This college level course includes both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific examples . A large percentage of time is spent focused on the three branches of government and their roles in our lives. It also requires familiarity with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. politics. Students will study the Constitution to understand their civil liberties and rights. Students completing this course will be empowered to find an active role in politics.

 

AP Human Geography 

Human geography is much more than the study of maps. This class focuses on the study of human beings, and analyzing the patterns of how we live on this earth. Topics include the study of human populations, culture, race and ethnicity, religion, languages, politics, human- environment interactions; (from Neolithic farmers to industrialization), the growth of cities (urbanization), and globalization. This course is a general survey or introductory course in the field of human geography; it is the equivalent of a one-semester entry- level college course. This counts as a G elective for UC/CSU. This course will open your eyes to the large and complex world that we live in. It will encourage you to see the world through different lenses, and hopefully will inspire you to travel and explore more for yourself after high school. This course will be rigorous, challenging and at times difficult. You should take this course because you are interested in the subject, and want to develop the academic skills that will prepare you for college.

 

 

 

AP Psychology (for Teacher’s Academy students only)

This is the senior capstone course for students enrolled in the Teacher Academy.  The course is designed to introduce students to the systematic and scientific study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals. Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated with each of the major subfields within psychology. They also learn about the ethics and methods psychologists use in their science and practice.  The course includes weekly visits to elementary schools that allow students to observe principles of psychology is action.  

 

WORLD LANGUAGES

Advanced Placement in Chinese/Japanese/Spanish Language

Advanced Placement Spanish Literature

These courses follow the College Entrance Examination Board course description for advanced placement work in world languages. They prepare students to take the AP examination in May.

 

VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS

Advanced Placement Studio Art 2D

This independent AP class is a studio-based visual arts class emphasizing design: the formal elements of design such as line, color, texture, space, value, shape and form, as well as the principles of design:  unity, balance, contrast, repetition and variety.  Students enrolled must show a high level of motivation, independence and the ability to work on their own inside and outside of class.  The advanced level of this class means students will be learning college foundation artwork while in this course.  The AP portfolio requirements expect the student to address the following three main concepts:  breadth, concentration and quality.  Students will be expected to develop mastery in concept, composition and execution of ideas.  A successful completion and submission of a portfolio is required, and if scored a 3 or higher, may earn college credit at participating universities.  Artworks created prior to and outside of the AP course will be identified and may be considered for inclusion in the AP Art portfolio.  A minimum of 24 works dealing with the formal aspects of design will be completed for final portfolio submission to the College Board.   There are a variety of means for this expression including, but not limited to drawing, painting, photography, graphic design, mixed media, and collage.  Any 2-D process is acceptable to explore except for 3-D, video and photocopies of work.

 

Advanced Placement Studio Art 3D

Students taking Ceramics for a second year will be considered Independent Study students and will be working on an AP 3D Portfolio. In this college-level course, students will pursue the investigation of three-dimensional form in ceramics. It is important that students learn to express themselves in their own personal style, using the elements and principles of art. Students will develop mastery in concept, composition and execution. Critiques with peers and teacher will be an ongoing process and form part of the assessment grade for the course. Other assessments will be formative (critiques, brainstorming, etc) and summative (tests) as requirements are completed. AP Studio Art is a program administered by the College Board to provide highly motivated student with an opportunity to earn college credit. Students will create a portfolio of artwork exploring 3D art and document that work using digital photography. In  May, students will submit their completed portfolio consisting of digital images to the College Board for scoring. If students receive a passing score of 3, 4, or 5 they may receive college credit for the class.

 

Advanced Placement Art History

This course not only seeks to understand history through studying its works of art, but also to understand art by studying the context in which it was created.  Works of art document history.    How does art change through time, as the society and culture change?  What can art tell us about the people who lived and worked during the time period?  Students will learn to recognize art and architecture, its creator, time period, and meaning.  Students will write about art using the vocabulary necessary, compare and contrast different works, learn how artists borrow from one another and discuss how the art relates to the time and place of creation.  Students will learn how to collect and organize pertinent information, cross reference it and write coherently about it using the proper vocabulary.

Literature Book.png

Mathematics.jpg

Science.jpg

World Languages.jpg